High Street Royal Mile | All About Edinburgh

High Street History

High Street was the most populated part of Edinburgh, with tenement buildings up to 11 stories high. On November 15th 1824 a tenement of 11 stories on the upper or High Street West, southside caught alight and was the beginning of the worst fire in the history of Edinburgh. Starting at around 10 pm that evening the fire spread from the tenement in Assembly Close to buildings in Old Fishmarket close. Down to the Tron Kirk in the east. It also spread south along the Cowgate. The fire was finally extinguished the next morning 12 hours from when it had started. That was not the end, as another fire started at 10 pm that evening which destroyed what was left on the south side of the High Street. All but St Giles Cathedral and the Parliament buildings were saved. Over four hundred families were left homeless.

High Street West (upper) Royal Mile Edinburgh

The High Street in the Royal Mile can be found between the Royal Mile Lawnmarket and the Royal Mile Canongate. The first part of the High Street, the upper High Street or High Street West is from the junction of St Giles Street and the cross roads at the North and South Bridges. In this section you will find  West Parliament Square, the Signet Library, Parliament House, Charles II Statue, Heart of Midlothian, St Giles Cathedral,  John Knox Statue and grave, Mercat Cross, Advocates Close, Edinburgh City Chambers, Real Mary Kings Close, Tron Kirk and many close's and courts. Which are all below.

High Street Royal Mile (Upper) Edinburgh
High Street  Upper  Royal Mile  Edinburgh

West Parliament Square High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

West Parliament Square High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh is the Square on the west of St Giles Cathedral. A statue of the 5th Duke of Buccleuch stands in the middle with the houses of Parliament, Signet library, St Giles Cathedral (west entrance) and the County Building on three sides. In the cobbles are the Heart of Midlothian, dates on cobbles near the statue and brass cobbles showing the outline of the old Tolbooth. Above the the door to St Giles Cathedral are statues of kings and bishops.

Lothian Chambers West Parliament Square Royal Mile Edinburgh 

The Lothian Chambers Building was built in 1904 and was used for the administration of Midlothian Council. The building is now used as a venue for marriages. On the corner of the building at the Lawnmarket is a plaque showing the place where the last person in Edinburgh was hanged. A man in his early 30’s battered and slit the throat of a 23-year-old girl in a crime of passion. The brass cobbles in the street show where the gallows were

5th Duke of Buccleuch Statue

The statue of Walter Francis Montagu Douglas Scott (1806 – 1884) the 5th Duke of Buccleuch and the 7th Duke of Queensbury was erected in West Parliament Square Edinburgh High Street in 1888. The Duke of Buccleuch was born in Dalkeith House Midlothian and was a very wealthy land baron. He became the Duke on the death of his father at the age of 13. He was knighted in 1835 and served in Prime Minister Peel’s government in the 1840s. There is still a Duke of Buccleuch to this day, the 10th Duke of Buccleuch and the 12th Duke of Queensbury lives in Drumlanrig Castle. He is also the Chief of Clan Scott. Drumlanrig Castle is home to the world renowned Buccleuch Art collection. The Castle and Estate can be found south of Sanquhar in Dumfriesshire off the A76.  

 5th Duke of Buccleuch high street Royal Mile edinburgh

Signet Library

The Signet Library building was completed in 1822 for the historic visit to Edinburgh and Scotland of King George IV. On his visit he described the upper library as “the finest drawing room in Europe”. The Signet library is the home of the Society of Writers to her Majesty’s Signet an association of Scottish lawyers. Which is believed to be the oldest professional society in the world. The earliest recorded use of the Signet was in 1369.

West Parliament Square High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh Dated Cobbles

There are two sets of cobbles in West Parliament Square one set has dates 1386, 1610 and 1678 in the Cobbles beside the statue of 5th Duke of Buccleuch. the other set are near the Heart of Midlothian cobbles with dates 1386, 1430, 1610. The date 1386 represents The rebuild of St Giles and the Tolbooth after Richard II had Burnt Edinburgh in 1385. In 1610 an extension was built to the tolbooth for prisoners. In 1678 a further extension was built to the tolbooth where an older part had been previously demolished. The only historic fact that I can relate 1430 to is on the 16th October 1430,  James I of Scotland son was born at Holyrood Abbey in Edinburgh later to become James II.

Heart of Midlothian Royal Mile High Street Edinburgh

The Heart of Midlothian is a heart-shaped mosaic built into the pavement next to St Giles on the High Street. Together with brass markers set into the pavement, it records the position of the 15th-century Old Tolbooth demolished in 1817, which was the administrative centre of the town, the prison and one of several sites of public execution. Some people spit on the heart. Although it is now said to be done for good luck, it was originally done as a sign of disdain for the former prison. The brass cobbles mark where the Tolbooth stood.

St Giles Cathedral High Street Edinburgh

There are records that show a parish church being in Edinburgh in 854 A.D. The parish church of Edinburgh was formally dedicated by the bishop of St Andrews on 6 October 1243. The parish church of Edinburgh was subsequently de-consecrated and named in honour of the patron saint of Edinburgh, St Giles. St Giles a Greek Holy man who settled in the south of France in the 7th century and was said to be associated with the early Frankish Kings, in particular Charles Martel (688–741). St Giles is seen in the carving above the west door of St Giles Cathedral Edinburgh (pictured below).He is said to have stopped a hunter’s arrow with his hand and saved a deer. There are many stories of St Giles and his miracles throughout history. St Giles later became the patron saint of both Edinburgh and the Cathedral now known as St Giles Cathedral. He died on the 1st September 721 A.D

allaboutedinburgh royal mile high street Saint Gile's Cathedral

There are two doors to St Giles Cathedral the West Door which is now the main entrance and has statues of Kings and Bishops above it and the East Door once the main entrance but now seldom used.  Above the the east door can be seen one of very few statues of St Andrew, who is the patron saint of Scotland. The west door of St Giles Cathedral was originally the back door, but over time with more space in West Parliament Square for the people to congregate before and after services the  west door was adopted as the main entrance. Above the door there are a number of statues and in the centre a carved stone of St Giles with a Roe that he had saved from a lethal arrow with his hand. The many statues are of Kings and clergymen of St Giles Cathedral. 

allaboutedinburgh royal mile high street Saint Gile's Cathedral doorway
allaboutedinburgh royal mile high street Saint Gile's Cathedral carved wall tablet of St giles

BISHOP WILLIAM FORBES.

Left of picture Bishop William Forbes In 1634 William Forbes became the first bishop of Edinburgh, with St Giles as his Cathedral. Bishop Forbes Died on the 12 April 1634 shortly after becoming the first bishop of Edinburgh.Bishop William Forbes is buried in St Giles Cathedral.

ALEXANDER HENDERSON

Right of picture Alexander Henderson a Presbyterian minister moved from his parish in Leuchars, St Andrews to become the minister of the High Kirk of St Giles in Edinburgh.  When King Charles visited Scotland in 1641 Alexander Henderson 

was appointed Dean of the Chapel Royal at Holyrood. He was also instrumental in the writing of the National Covenant and became the Moderator of the general assembly on more than one occasion. He died in Edinburgh in 1646 and is buried in Greyfriar’s Churchyard Edinburgh. 

allaboutedinburgh royal mile high street Saint Gile's Cathedral statues

KING JAMES I  (centre of picture)

James I became King on the death of his father in 1406 but he was not crowned at Scone Palace until 1423. The reason for the 17 years’ delay in his being crowned was that he was imprisoned in London.  While in prison his uncle Robert of Albany ruled Scotland and was happy for James to remain in prison hoping that one day he or his son Murdoch would become king. When James was released at age 30 he took over as king. He then began restoring  the monarchy and forfeited the lands of the rebellious nobles including the Dukes of Albany. He was a strong leader and introduced social and economic legislation and founded the Scottish Court of Session. In 1437 James was killed in a Dominican Monastery in Perth.

allaboutedinburgh royal mile high street Saint Gile's Cathedral statues

KING JAMES VI of SCOTLAND AND I OF ENGLAND  (right of picture)

James son of Mary Queen of Scots and Henry Darnley, was born in Edinburgh Castle in 1566. James became the youngest King of Scotland at the age of thirteen months. In 1603, he also became king of England and Ireland. He continued to reign  in all three kingdoms for 22 years. In 1605 a small group of Catholics, led by a man called Robert Catesby, devised a scheme to kill James and as many members of Parliament as possible. Catesby's plan involved blowing up the Houses of Parliament on 5th November as in the Guy Fawkes rhyme, “Remember Remember the 5th of November gunpowder treason and plot”, Catesby being Guy Fawkes. The 5th of November was chosen because James was due to open Parliament on that day. At 57 years and 246 days, his reign in Scotland was the longest of any previous King. James died in 1625 at the age of 58 and is buried in Westminster Abbey.

ROBERT THE BRUCE (King Robert I)  left of picture

Robert I, known as Robert the Bruce, became King of Scots on 25 March 1306. At the Battle of Bannockburn in June 1314, he led a Scottish army and defeated the English army lead by Edward II. To confirm an independent Scottish monarchy in 1320 a letter was sent to Pope John XXII declaring that Robert the Bruce was their rightful monarch. This letter was the 'Declaration of Arbroath' and it asserted the antiquity of the Scottish people and their monarchy.  In 1324 Robert the Bruce received papal recognition as king of an independent Scotland. Robert died on 7 June 1329. He was buried in Dunfermline Abbey and his heart is buried in Melrose Abbey.

GAVIN DOUGLAS  left of picture

Gavin Douglas was born in 1474 at Tantallon Castle, Dunbar East Lothian. Gavin Douglas was a Scottish Bishop,royal court poet, courtier and translator. Gavin Douglas was appointed provost of St. Giles Church, Edinburgh, around 1501 and is best known for his translation of Virgil's Aeneid into Scots, the English language of the lowlands of Scotland. He was made bishop of Dunkled in 1516 and died in London in 1522.

JOHN KNOX right of picture

John Knox was born in the Haddington area of East Lothian in approximately 1514. He was appointed minister of the Church of St. Giles in 1560.  John Knox was married twice and his second marriage in 1564 was not looked upon favourably because John Knox was 50 and his new wife was only 17. He was considered to be the greatest Reformer in the history of Scotland. Knox died on 24 November 1572 in Edinburgh, his epitaph: "Here lyeth a man who in his life never feared the face of man, who hath been often threatened with dagger, but yet hath ended his dayes in peace and honour."

allaboutedinburgh royal mile high street Saint Gile's Cathedral statues

KING DAVID I. (Below-centre of picture)

David was born in 1084, he spent many years in the court of Henry I, which gave him a good education. David became King of Scotland in 1124 on the death of his brother. He established the feudal system in Scotland. He also introduced many novel ideas such as silver coinage and promoting education. He also carried on his brother’s quest to build many Abbeys which included Holyrood Abbey and Inchcolm Abbey. David died peacefully in Carlisle in 1153 at the age of 69 and is buried in Dunfermline Abbey. During his reign he founded The Abbey of Holyrood  in 1128 and built the Chapel in Edinburgh Castle a memorial to his mother Queen Margaret who died in 1093. Later becoming Saint Margaret in 1250.

allaboutedinburgh royal mile high street Saint Gile's Cathedral statues

KING ALEXANDER I. (Above-left of picture)

Alexander I was born in 1078 and was the eldest brother of three David I and Alexander III his brothers. Alexander I established an Augustinian priory at Scone sometime between 1114 and 1122. In 1123 Alexander I on a journey had to shelter on Inchcolm Island in the Firth of Forth during a storm, he promised to build a monastery in thanks for being saved from the storm but died in 1124 before being able to keep his promise. His brother David I kept his brothers promise and invited Augustinian canons to establish a priory on the island and it later became an Abbey in 1235. Alexander I died in Stirling on the 23 April 1124 and is buried in Dunfermline Abbey. 

KING ALEXANDER III  (Above-right of picture)

Alexander was born on the 4 September 1241. He was King at the age of 7 from 1249. At 21 he formally approached the Norwegian King Haakon for the Western Isles which Haakon rejected. In 1263 King Haakon died and his successor agreed to the Treaty of Perth by which he gave the Isle of Man and the Western Isles to Scotland in return for a large sum of money. Norway kept control of Orkney and Shetland. Alexander died when he fell from his horse in Kinghorn in Fife on 18 March 1286. Travelling on his way from Edinburgh to visit his Queen on her birthday, which was the next day. In 1886, a monument to Alexander III was erected at the approximate location of his death in Kinghorn. Alexander was buried in Dunfermline Abbey in 1286.                                                                            

Parliament Square High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Parliament House was completed in 1639. The inauguration of the supreme court of Scotland was by King James V in 1532. On the east of Parliament Square was previously where Parliament Close (1816) once stood prior to the great fire of 1700 and where the Bank of Scotland opened and incorporated by royal charter in 1695 before burning down 5 years later. Now the square has the law courts and St Giles Cathedral east door which was the original front entrance. A carved statue high above the door to the south depicts St Andrew. To the right stands the Mercat Cross. The Statue opposite is of James Braidwood father of the Fire Service, further to the rear of St Giles is the oldest lead statue of Charles II on horseback and further round is the grave of John Knox.

Saint Andrew (above the east door)

When visiting St Giles Cathedral take a walk round the exterior and see the many carvings. High above the east door of St Giles Cathedral stands a carved statue of St Andrew holding two fish. Below the statue an angel holds a scroll with his name carved on it and above two angels hold a shield with the cross of St Andrew. You will also see a number of other carvings above and around the doorway which dates from the late 1380s. You will find shields with the crosses of St George and St Andrew, and decoration of Thistles, Roses and Fleur de Lis. Also shields with coats of arms that include James VII and Queen Anne.

allaboutedinburgh royal mile high street Saint Gile's Cathedral statue of Saint Andrew

John Knox Royal Mile High Street Edinburgh

The small stone above the number 23 in a council parking space marks the position of John Knox grave, in the once graveyard of St Giles Cathedral. (Now a council car park). John Knox was a very important part of the history of the church in Scotland and was behind the Government in 1560 severing contact with the Pope and catholic faith. He was the head of the Scottish reformation and from 1559 till his death in 1572 was the minister of the High Kirk of St Giles, in Edinburgh. The statue of John Knox can be seen in the quadrangle in the New Library on Mound Place. 

 john knox statue New College Mound Place
john knox grave saint giles cathedral High Street Royal Mile car park

King Charles II (May 1630 –Feb 1685) Royal Mile High Street Edinburgh

King Charles II Statue dressed as a Roman Emperor on horseback is the oldest lead cast statue in Great Britain. The statue of King Charles II stands in Parliament Square behind St Giles Cathedral and was first erected in 1685.              

 king charles 2nd statue Royal Mile high street edinburgh
Charles II Parliament Square High Street

JAMES BRAIDWOOD  Royal Mile High Street Edinburgh

 James Braidwood 1800 – 1861 is known as the father of the British Fire Service, James Braidwood was born in Edinburgh and founded the world's first municipal fire service in Edinburgh in 1824. A statue of James Braidwood can be seen in Parliament Square and is dedicated to his memory.  He was a pioneer of the scientific approach to fire-fighting, an approach that has saved lives all over the world.

 royal mile James braidwood statue high street edinburgh

Barrie's Close | Steil’s Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

This close has had many names and changed after the 2 separate fires of 1824 and 1700. Known as St Monan’s Wynd after a chapel that stood in the Wynd, Also Hangman’s Close as the city’s Hangman lived here and Steil’s Close after Patrick Steel a merchant, Later to be New Bank Close and Barry’s Close and Back of Parliament Close. This close still survives as it stood from the 1600s from the south east corner of Parliament Square previously Parliament Close in an L shape into Old Fishmarket Close which previously had two entrances from the High Street in a Y shape and one entrance from the Cowgate.  

Adam Smith Statue Royal Mile High Street Edinburgh

Adam Smith's 1723 – 1790 statue stands beside the Mercat Cross in the High Street, Royal Mile Edinburgh. Adam Smith lived in Panmure House in Lochend Close, in the Canongate and is buried in the Canongate Kirk Graveyard, behind the Canongate Kirk. Adam Smith was a Scottish moral philosopher and a pioneer of political economy. He was one of the key figures of the Scottish Enlightenment.  In 1776 The Wealth of Nations, is considered his magnum opus and the first modern work of economics. Smith is cited as the father of modern economics. In 2009 Adam Smith was named among the "Greatest Scots" of all time, in a vote run by Scottish television.

 Adam Smith statue high street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Edinburgh Mercat Cross, Parliament Square, High Street, Royal Mile

The Mercat Cross was first mentioned in 1365 when the cross stood in the middle of the High Street down from St Giles Cathedral. In 1885 the cross was placed on a new octagonal drum substructure at its current location. The use of a Mercat Cross in Scotland was for important civic announcements. In Edinburgh government proclamations that affected all of Scotland were also publicly read at the cross, for example, announcements concerning successions to the monarchy and the calling to parliament. Which are still announced to this day from the Mercat Cross in Edinburgh. The only Mercat Cross that remains in its original form and position can be found in Prestonpans East Lothian. The Unicorn is the ancient emblem of Scotland and stands at the top of the Mercat Cross.

mercat cross prestonpans
 mercat cross high street Royal Mile Edinburgh
mercat cross selkirk

Edinburgh Mercat Cross Door

The door that can be seen in the picture above is the entrance to the steps that take you to the platform that is surrounded by a parapet where the announcements are made. Above the door of the Cross there is a Latin inscription which was  written by  William Gladstone.

Mercat Cross Parliment Square High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Medallions Edinburgh Mercat Cross High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

The Medallions that are around the Edinburgh Mercat Cross are not the originals. The original medallions can be seen in Sir Walter Scott's House in Melrose.  Abbotsford House where Walter Scott lived and created master pieces.

Mecat Cross City of Edinburgh Coat of Arms Medallion

CITY OF EDINBURGH

COAT OF ARMS

Mecat Cross Irish Coat of Arms Medallion

                IRISH   

    COAT OF ARMS

        LEITH COAT OF ARMS

Mecat Cross Coat of Arms of Britain Medallion

ROYAL COAT OF ARMS

OF BRITAIN

Mecat Cross English Coat of Arms Medallion

              ENGLISH      

     COAT OF ARMS       

 mercat cross medalion high street edinburgh

         SCOTTISH COAT OF ARMS

Mecat Cross University of Edinburgh Coat of Arms Medallion

UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

            COAT OF ARMS

Mecat Cross Canongate Coat of Arms Medallion

          CANONGATE

        COAT OF ARMS

UNICORN OF SCOTLAND 

Mercat Cross Cobbles Royal Mile High Street Edinburgh

The location of the Edinburgh Mercat Cross between 1617 and 1756 can be seen in an octagonal arrangement of cobble stones on the pavement outside the entrance to Old Fishmarket Close in the High street Edinburgh. This was the second position in which the Mercat Cross had stood, the first being in the centre of the road further down the High Street.

 mercat cross Royal Mile cobbles high street edinburgh

Old Fishmarket Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

The location of the Edinburgh Mercat Cross between 1617 and 1756 can be seen in an octagonal arrangement of cobble stones on the pavement outside the entrance to Old Fishmarket Close in the High street Edinburgh. This was the second position in which the Mercat Cross had stood, the first being in the centre of the road further down the High Street. Adam Smith stands to the right of the close. Old Fishmarket close was one of the casualties of the Great 1824 fire as it was destroyed. Other facts about the Old Fishmarket Close are Edinburgh’s residents would buy their fish and poultry. George Heriot known as “Jinglin’ Geordie”, the kings Jeweller and the founder of George Heriot’s Hospital (school), the school J K Rowling described as Hogwarts in the Harry Potter books and Films. This was also a close that housed the first firefighting appliance.

Lothian & Borders Police Information Centre & Museum

This is the place for people to report crime get directions and information on all aspects of the Police force and their duties. There is also an exhibition of the history of the Police in Edinburgh the criminals like William (Deacon) Brodie the raffles of his time. Burke and Hare the serial Killers for money.

Borthwick’s Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

 

Borthwick’s Close originally called Lord Borthwick’s Close who built a house here circa 1450 to be close to the Scottish Parliament building and the signet  being and advocate and siting in the parliament. The Borthwick clan were related through marriage to Henry VIII and were close to the royal courts of the kings of Scotland and England. Also see Borthwick Castle in Midlothian where the Borthwick’s lived over the centuries. 

Old Assembly Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Old Assembly Close Edinburgh was the first place for the high society of Edinburgh to have formal dances to met the opposite sex. The founder of the University of Edinburgh Library,  Clement Little lived here as did his brother William Little who was Lord Provost of Edinburgh in 1591. Scene of the great fire of 1824. When a fire started and raged for over 3 days spreading down to the Tron and up to Parliament Square which destroyed over 400 family homes.    

Old Assembly Close Dancing Assemblies were held in the hall from 1720 to 1766. (Described by Goldsmith) Residence of Clement Little Founder of The University Library. And his brother Provost William Little.

Advocates in Old Assembly Close
Bronze Plaque Old Assembly Close Royal Mile Edinburgh

Covenant Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Covenant Close was named after a mansion house where the national covenant was kept for signing.

The Scots people wishing to keep their identity both religious and national. Started a movement against Archbishop Laud and his beliefs to reform the church. A ceremony took place in Greyfriars Kirk Edinburgh In February of 1638 which all the Scottish Noblemen, Hierarchy, Ministers and Officials attended and signed the National Covenant, which committed them under God to preserving the purity of the Kirk. The National Covenant was a protest against interference with the religion of the free people. The mansion later became a Tavern.

Burnet’s Close Royal Mile High Street Edinburgh

 Burnet’s Close was named after Samuel Burnet, a brewer and wealthy merchant of Edinburgh, The close was also Johnston’s Close, after Bailie James Johnston, deacon of the Hammermen also lived here. The Close has changed name many times through the years as the properties changed hands.

Bell’s Wynd High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Bell’s Wynd known as Clam shell Land, named after John Bell a brewer who lived and had a tenement in the wynd circa 1529, later George Crichton, Bishop of Dunkeld stayed in the house of John Bell who had Bell’s Brewery in the Pleasance. 

High Street Wellhead High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

The High Street Wellhead can be found up from the Tron Kirk in the High Street Edinburgh. The High Street Well Head is where the people of Edinburgh would collect their water as the only water came from the reservoir at Castlehill and was piped to the cisterns (well heads) one in the Lawnmarket, two in the High Street and one in the Grassmarket then later one in the Canongate. 

New Assembly Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

New Assembly Close in the High Street, Royal Mile was where the mansion of Murray of Blackbarony circa 1580 Ancestor of the Lord’s of Elibank. It was also where the commercial Bank of Scotland was housed The Assembly Hall moved here in 1766 – 1784 and the Edinburgh Waxworks Museum from 1976 – 1989.   

Stevenlaw’s Close Royal Mile High Street Edinburgh

Little is known about this Close as it was demolished due to Edinburgh’s Great Fire of 1824 when the south side of the high street was almost all completely burned in the fire. The fire started in a tenement in Old Fishmarket Close and spread quickly down to the Cowgate and to the Tron Kirk. The Blaze lasted over two days and hundreds of families were made homeless. It is said the close was named after a follower of Queen Mary in 1571 who she honoured with the Close being given his name Steven Law. Over time names were changed due to miss spelling.

Edinburgh City Guard House High Street Royal Mile

Edinburgh City (Town) Guard was constituted by the Edinburgh Town Council in 1648 however an armed guard was not in place until 1679. The City Guard House was situated in the High street across from Stevenslaw Close. The Guard House was demolished in 1817 after the disbandment of the guard in the same year. In the cobbles on the high street is the outline of the old Guards House opposite Stevenslaw Close. 

 

The Cobbles show the outline of where the the old guard House stood in the High Street prior to 1817

Marlin’s Wynd High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Marlin’s Wynd is below the level of the present streets as Mary King’s Close is. Marlin’s Wynd was to the west of the Tron Kirk and ran down to the Cowgate. Named after John Merlyoune (Marlin), who was in charge of paving the High Street. He requested in memory of his work that he would be buried underneath the paving stones. He was buried at the head of the Wynd (which was named after him) by paving stones in the shape of a grave. Other writings mention that the High Street was paved in 1532 by two brothers John and Bartoulme Foliot. Also a John Merlyoune was paid for building Register House in Edinburg Castle in 1542 giving foundation to the first writings.

Hunter Square High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh, Sir Chris Hoy Gold Mail Box

Sir Chris Hoy MBE, won his first Olympic gold medal in 2004. He won 3 Olympic gold medals in Beijing and was knighted by the queen in 2009. In the London Olympics of 2012 all British gold medal winners also received a post box painted gold in their home city/town. Sir Chris Hoy won 2 gold medals and there are 2 post boxes in Edinburgh one in Hunter Square of the Royal Mile and the other in Hanover Street across from the Art Galleries at the foot of The Mound. Chris Hoy is Scotland’s most successful Olympian. Sir Chris Hoy was educated at George Watson and Edinburgh University. With 6 Olympic gold medals and 11 world championships he is most definitely a world sports superstar.

Blair Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Blair Street was formed when the South Bridge was being built in 1768. To give access to the Cowgate from the High Street, at that time Marlin’s Wynd and  Pebble's Wynd were demolished in 1785 with the west side of Niddry Street. Blair Street as Hunter Square was named after Lord Provost Sir James Hunter Blair.

Hunter Square Royal Mile Edinburgh Gold Post Box

Tron Kirk High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Looking from the North Bridge and down the High Street during the Edinburgh Festival in August with the Tron Kirk in the distance. The Tron kirk was founded by King Charles I as the congregation at St Giles require a church due to St Giles now being a cathedral. The Tron Kirk was built circa 1644. Due to the Great fires in 1824 the Tron’s Steeple was burnt down and rebuilt in 1824 The Tron was closed as a church in 1952. The area beside the Tron was the original place for bringing in the bells (celebrating the changing of the old year to new). The Inscription on the wall tablet tells of the spire being burnt and rebuilt.

High Street West| Royal Mile | (Upper) North Side |Edinburgh

St Giles Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

St Giles Street Royal Mile is opposit West Parliament Square and in the far right hand corner can be found the News Steps that take you to Market Street close to Waverley Rail Station.

Byre’s Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Byres Close is where Adam Bothwell the Bishop of Orkney’s Mansion stood. Last to reside in the Close was said to be one of the wealthiest people in Scotland Sir William Dick of Braid, Lord Provost of Edinburgh in 1638 and relation to the Baronets of Prestonfield.

Advocate’s Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Advocate’s Close was named after Sir James Stewart of Goodtrees (Lord  Advocate of Scotland 1692 – 1713).  The Stewart family owned and lived in the Close from 1648 – 1769. Advocates Close has had many names as the name would change by the owner at the time. Oliver Cromwell visited here on two occasions. other occupants of the Close were David Dalrymple, Lord Westhall, Andrew Crosbie and the artist John Scougal to William III.  Also the Mansion of Bishop Bothwell circa 1590. There are two doorway with inscribed lintels No 2  

   

Old Scottish tradition the initials of both husband and wife and date they moved in to house, Clement Cor built the tenement circa 1590, his wife, Helen Bellenden.Inscriptions : C.C  H.B   SPES . ALTERA . VITAE (Hope The Other Life). 1590  The other lintel Inscriptions : O Lord (not readable).

Roxburgh’s Close High Street Edinburgh

Roxburgh’s Close on the north side of the High Street in the Royal Mile Edinburgh is named after John Roxburgh a chef and Burgess of Edinburgh in 1605. As most close’s the name changed with the owner of the land as this was owned originally by Henry Cant who owned property in Advocate’s Close. The Close is also famous for another resident Donnchadh Ban MacIntyre a famous Gaelic Poet. At the foot of Roxburgh’s Close is a courtyard which I believe was part of Writers’ Court as the doorway from Warriston’s close that enters the building where Zizzi restaurant stands has a lintel with the initials of the Chambers brothers Robert and William and the date 1851. 

In the centre of Roxburgh Court are four iron slabs with carvings and dates with names. The four slabs represent the trees that once stood in the courtyard and the dates of their planting. The trees are from new world destinations of the time.  1725 Acer Saccharinum (silver maple from North American Maple).1767  Betula dalecarlica (A Swedish Birch tree from Sweden), 1842 Betula Utilis (Himalayan Birch Tree from Nepal), 1906  Sorbus Commixta (Japanese rowan tree from Japan).

Writers’ Court High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Writers' Court is found off Warriston's Close The lintel of the door is where the court once stood. The initials are WC (William Chambers) a publisher and printer like his brother RC (Robert Chambers). They lived in Writers' Court in 1851. 

Warriston’s Close High Street Edinburgh

Warriston’s Close named after Lord Warriston who lived in the close, as  did Sir Thomas Craig of Riccarton. William and Robert Chambers who lived in Writers’ Close on the west side of Warriston’s Close were just a few of the famous residents. The previous name of  the close were Bruce’s Close after Robert Bruce of Stirling who lived here in 1566. Access to Warriston Close can also be gained from Roxburgh’s Close. Thee other more famous close which can be accessed from Warriston’s Close is Real Mary King’s Close. This close can only be accessed from the attraction as this is an underground street and possibly buried when the plague was at its height.  

John Knox Manse Warriston's Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

The site of John Knox’s Manse can be found in Warriston’s Close. Go in the Archway marked  Warriston’s Close and Writer’s Court and turn left and down steps and you will see the plaque next to a black door. Other people who lived here are Sir Archibald Johnston (Lord Warriston) 1611 -1663, who named the Close. As the naming of closes and land (tenements) was usually done by the owners.   

REAL MARY KING’S CLOSE ROYAL MILE HIGH STREET EDINBURGH

This is a real look back in to Edinburgh’s past. The underground streets and places where the people of Edinburgh lived, a historically accurate example of life in Edinburgh between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, Tales of ghosts, legends and murders. Where the plague victims were walled up and left to die. Take the guided tour based on a onetime resident, and listen to the fascinating stories. Real Mary Kings Close Edinburgh and the entrance to the underground street.

Edinburgh City Chambers (Exchange Building) High Street Royal Mile

Exchange Buildings foundation stone was laid in September 1753 by the Grand Master of the Scottish masons George Drummond. The New Royal Exchange was completed in 1761.  Designed by John Adam. In 1811 it became the City Chambers when the Town Council moved here from the Tolbooth.  The Edinburgh Council Chambers was extended in 1904 and 1934 it has served as the administrative centre for Edinburgh Corporation, since 1975 for the Council of the City of Edinburgh

The inscription on the bronze plaque reads; THE CITY CHAMBERS –  FORMERLY – THE ROYAL EXCHANGE – DESIGNED BY JOHN ADAM THE ELDEST OF THE ADAM BROTHERS. – THIS BUILDING WAS ERECTED 1753 – 1761 – AS AN EXCHANGE AND CUSTOMS HOUSE – IN 1811 IT BECAME THE CITY CHAMBERS – WHEN THE TOWN COUNCIL MOVED HERE FROM THE TOLBOOTH. – EXTENDED IN 1904 AND 1924 IT SERVED AS – THE ADMINISTRATIVE CENTRE FOR EDINBURGH CORPORATION – AND SINCE 1978 FOR THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF EDINBURGH –  PRESENTED IN 1983 BY THE OLD EDINBURGH CLUB FOUNDED IN THE OLD COUNCIL CHAMBERS 29 JANUARY 1908 – Lord Provost George Drummond, laid the foundation-stone in September 1753.

Edinburgh Award Hollywood Style Stars Walk

Edinburgh Award printed on the paving stones of the City Chambers quadrangle you can see the golden hands of famous people awarded by Edinburgh, such as Author J.K. Rowling Olympic champion cyclist Sir Chris Hoy, Artist Richard Demarco, Author Ian Rankin, Singer Annie Lennox, Scientist Professor Peter Higgs, George Kerr CBE Judo 10th Dan, Dame Elizabeth Blackadder Painter, 46664 Concert Nelson Mandela speech. Tom Gilzean icon of the Royal Mile still raising funds for charity now in his 90s, Ken Buchanan Boxer, Undisputed World Lightweight Champion.

The High Constables of Edinburgh

Edinburgh’s Police Force, in the year 1611 the privy council of King James VI ordered the Burgh to appoint constables to impose law and order on the streets of Edinburgh. This was taken over by a regular police force in Edinburgh in 1805.

Hugh Miller 1802 – 1856 Plaque Royal Mile High Street Edinburgh

Geologist Naturalist and Folklorist. There is a bust of Hugh Miller in the Hall of Heroes at the Wallace Monument in Stirling. Hugh Miller was editor of Witness, an evangelical newspaper established in 1840 by the Scottish geologist and writer. He committed suicide in December 1856. A shocked Western world mourned him, and his funeral procession was among the largest in the memory of Edinburgh residents. He lived in the seaside area of Portobello.

Alexander the Great with his Horse Bucephalus

City Chambers High Street Edinburgh

The statue that stands in Edinburgh City Chambers quadrangle is of Alexander the Great and his horse Bucephalus. The statue was cast in Bronze in 1883. The wondrous horse Bucephalus the horse that Alexander the Great rode for thousands of miles and through many battles to create his mighty empire. Both Horse Bucephalus and owner Alexander the Great tower over the square of Edinburgh City Chambers on the High Street in the Royal Mile.

General Stanislaw Wadyslaw Maczek Statue 1892 -1994

General Stanislaw Wadyslaw Maczek reach the rank Lieutenant General in the Polish army and was the commander of the 1st Polish Panzer Division in World War II. Stanislaw was born in Lwow Poland in 1892 fought in the 1st World War with the Austrian Army and in the 2nd World War was Commander of the new formed 1st Polish Armoured Division, nicknamed “Black Division” which was created in February 1942 at Duns in Scotland. Stanislaw and his Polish Army numbering circa 1600 were trained over 2 years in Scotland before they took park in the Normandy Landings in 1944. He and his men were instrumental in the major part of the war in France and Germany and after the war he was left homeless. A friend and Sargent in his command gave him a job in his bar in Edinburgh. In 1985 he was invited to the city of Breda in the Netherlands for the anniversary of its liberation were he was given a heroes welcome. When he died at the age of 102 years in 1994 he was buried in the Polish military cemetery in Breda Netherlands. 

The Black Turnpike High Street Royal Mile

Mary Queen of Scots Last Night in Edinburgh 1567. 

The Black Turnpike, also known as the ‘Auld Bishop of Dunkeld’s lodging’ was built in 1461 on the south side of  the High Street immediately west of where the Tron Kirk now stands. It was demolished in 1788 to make way for Hunter Square and Blair Street. The plaque can be seen on the wall of the City Chambers.The inscription reads “On this site stood the lodging of Sir Simon Preston of Craigmillar (known as the Black Turnpike) the lord provost of the city of Edinburgh 1566 – 1567 in which lodging Mary Queen of Scotland after her surrender to the confederate lords at Carberry Hill was imprisoned overnight in Edinburgh 15 June 1567 in a stone chamber 13-foot square and 8-foot high. On the following evening she was conveyed to Holyrood and thereafter to Loch Leven Castle as a state prisoner. After 19 years of captivity, Mary was tried and condemned to death in October 1586, ending only with her execution at Fotheringhay on 8 February 1587”. To see more about Mary Queen of Scots visit Jedburgh where you can walk round where she once lived. With many interesting artefacts on display. 

The City of Edinburgh War Memorial

The memorial in front of the City Chambers building in the High Street Royal Mile. The stone of remembrance is to commemorate the people of Edinburgh who lost their lives in the 1st and 2nd World Wars It was unveiled on Armistice Day 1927 by Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester son of King George V.

Allan’s Close Royal Mile High Street Edinburgh

Allan’s Close was removed when the City Chambers extended their premises but a part of Allan’s Close remains underground and can only be seen on the Real Mary King’s Close tour of the old streets of Edinburgh.  The Close has had several names over time and each has been from the owner that lived there at the time.

Craig’s Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

The access to Craig’s Close from the High Street was closed when the Council offices were built in 1932. There were two parts to Craig’s Close, High Street – Cockburn Street (closed) and Cockburn Street – Market Street which is still open. Craig’s Close was the site of The Isle of Man Arms. The Edinburgh Cape Club’s main meeting place. The Close was named after John Craig, wright and Burgess of Edinburgh who was the 3rd husband of Ann Hamilton who owned the lands . A town Councillor.  You can see the Scotsman sign on the building near to where the close ran from the High Street to Market Street prior to the building of Cockburn Street. This is where the first Scotsman Newspaper was published and printed circa 1865.

The Cape Club

At the foot of Craig’s Close that at one time started in the High Street Royal Mile and ended the Nor Loch, then was split by the building of Cockburn Street there used to stand a tavern where the Cape Club met. The Plaque at the foot of the upper section of Craig’s Close reads; Craig’s Close | site of Cape Club | spiritual home of | Robert Fergusson | Distinguished Edinburgh Poet  | Died October 16 1774.

Anchor Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

 

Anchor’s Close was named after a tavern that was at the top of the close in 1714. The Close ran from the High Street to Market Street before Cockburn Street was built and dissected it.  In 1718 it change Landlords to and Dawney Douglas’s Tavern which was a meeting place of the Crochallan Fencibles, a club with a membership of a number of the most distinguished men of the town. The Crochallan Fencibles Club was founded by William Smellie, a printer who founded the Encyclopaedia Britannica. He also printed the first Edinburgh edition of Burns in 1787.

 

On the east side of the Close there are two 17th-century buildings, originally of four storeys. A doorway on the west side of the Close has a 17th-century inscription ”LORD BE MERCIFUL TO ME” and was the entrance to Dawney Douglas’s Tavern where the Crochallan Fencibles Club met.

 

Anchor Close has had many names as the name would change by the owner at the time. The Crochallan Fencibles was a convivial club for gentlemen which met in Dawney Douglas’s Tavern. William Smellie’s Printed Burns Poems and Allan Masterton wrote the music for Burns songs were also members of the club. Dawney Douglas’s Tavern was a very popular place as it served very good food at a very affordable price.

Geddes’ Entry Royal Mile High Street Edinburgh

John Kay 1742 – 1826     

Geddes’ Entry connects with North Foulis’ Close and Old Stamp Office Close and was named after Robert Geddes of Scotstoun a surgeon by profession. On the front wall above the shops can be seen a plaque to John Kay. John Kay was a trained Barber and opened a shop at High Street where he became established and a member of the corporation of barber-surgeons in 1771. John Kay then changed his trade to become a successful painter of miniatures and also publishing sketches and caricatures of the local people which many were unhappy about the way they were portrayed.

North Foulis’ Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

 

North Foulis Close named after John Foulis, who owned the land were he traded  as an apothecary (Chemist) and owner of a tenement in the close it was North because of further down the High Street was South Foulis’ Close at No 32 with no connection to this close or owner, near to Hyndford’s Close. 

James Gillespie

James Gillespie was an Edinburgh city merchant and founder of James Gillespie’s Hospital and School. The hospital opened in 1802 and could accommodate up to 66 Pensioners and the school. The school was originally sited at Gillespie Crescent near to the original hospital at Wright’s house. James Gillespie was born in Edinburgh on the 28 April 1726 and died at his home in Spylaw, Colinton a suburb of Edinburgh on 8 April 1797. His brothers, John and James were Tobacco and snuff merchants at 231 High street Edinburgh and had their own factory at the back of their house at Spylaw. Due to the civil war in the Americas they were a main British supplier to the trade and controlled the prices at the time.

     

The inscription on the plaque reads; Formerly | the shop of | James Gillespie | of Spylaw | Tobacco and Snuff | Manufacturer | Founder of | James Gillespie’s | Hospital | and Schools | died 8 April 1797 | erected by | The governors 1883

Old Stamp Office Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

The Close’s in Edinburgh were named after the owners of buildings in the close at the time and thus had many names through time. Old Stamp Office Close was where the Stamp Office was for many years until it moved to Waterloo Place in 1821. It was the first place the Royal Bank of Scotland had offices when they were constituted in 1727 and remained here till 1753. It was also where Countess Eglinton and her seven beautiful daughters lived. Lady Eglinton and her daughters were the people to invite to any dance or party in the 1700s. There was also a school where the famous Flora McDonald of Skye was educated. She was famous for assisting Bonnie Prince Charlie in his escape after the battle of Culloden. The close has also been named after taverns, Ship Tavern close and Fortune’s Close. Both of these Taverns were in this close.

Lyon’s Close Royal Mile High Street Edinburgh 

Lyon’s Close 215 High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh between Old Stamp Office Close and Jackson’s Close. Possible entrance to Hospice of Elsie Inglis. Elsie Inglis was born on 16 August 1864 in Nainital India she first moved with her parents to Edinburgh in 1878   In 1892   Elsie Inglis qualified as a licentiate at the Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons in Edinburgh and Glasgow. In 1904 the small hospital opened by the Inglis family moved to the 219 High Street and was renamed The Hospice. In 1905 Inglis was appointed senior consultant of the Bruntsfield Hospital, which then merged with The Hospice in 1911. Elsie Inglis died on the 26 November 1917, she is interned in Dean Cemetery in Edinburgh. From funds that had been raise previously the remainder was used to establish the Elsie Inglis Memorial Maternity Hospital in Edinburgh in July 1925 which later became a part of the Royal Infirmary and still bears her name.

Jackson’s Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

Jackson’s Close on the North side of the upper High Street Royal Mile is named after John Jackson’s and his family who lived in the close from circa 1570 to at least 1893 when they sold property in the close. This close ends at Cockburn Street where many close’s were either split in two or shortened by the building of Cockburn Street which was a thoroughfare to Waverley Rail Station. 

Plaque King Charles I

When King Charles I decreed that the protestant book of common order was to replaced by a new catholic influenced Service book, he didn’t reckon with the reaction of the Scots! The anger felt by the people reached its peak in the church of St Giles in Edinburgh on the 22nd July 1637. When the Dean conducting the service began to read from the new service book. An old woman named Jenny Geddes flung her stool at the Dean’s head crying “Dost thou say mass at my lug?” thereby ensuring her place in history as a Scottish heroine.

Fleshmarket Close High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

 

Fleshmarket Close stretched from the High Street North to Market Street before Cockburn Street was built  (circa 1860) it cut through many old closes that stretched from the High Street northwards, which evidence of can be seen in  Fleshmarket Close where the smallest pub in Edinburgh can be found as well as Ginglin’ Geordies Tavern both on the north side of the severed close. On the High street side of the Fleshmarket Close was where Henry Dundas first practised as an Advocate and was to become the most powerful person in Scotland.

Edinburgh’s Smallest Pub Halfway House Fleshmarket Close Edinburgh

The smallest pub in Edinburgh can be found halfway down the north side of Fleshmarket Close on the way to the Market Street entrance of Waverley train station. This tavern offers real ale from all over Scotland.

Jinglin’ Geordie’s Pub Edinburgh

Jinglin’ Geordie’s in Fleshmarket Close was named after George Heriot a famous Edinburgh Jeweller and Goldsmith 1563 – 1624. George Heriot was Jeweller and Goldsmith to King James VI. When George Heriot died he had no family so he left his estate to build a school for the education of “Puire fatherless bairns o the toun of Edinburgh” (poor fatherless children of Edinburgh). The school is still a centre for education and has been described as the school J.K.Rowling’s inspiration for Hogwarts in the Harry Potter books.  The picture shows Jnglin’ Geordie’s Tavern looking up Fleshmarket Close to Cockburn Street. The short cut to the High Street Royal Mile from Market Street and Waverley Train Station

Cockburn Street High Street Royal Mile Edinburgh

(Lord Cockburn Street) 

Lord Henry Cockburn Born: 26 Oct 1779 Died: 26 Apr 1854

Lord Cockburn Street was built as an access to the Waverley Bridge Road at Waverley Rail Station  from the High Street near to the Tron Kirk. The Plans for Cockburn Street were submitted over a lengthy period circa 1850 and was completed in 1859. The most prominent building in Lord Cockburn Street was and still is The Scotsman Building where the Scotsman newspaper was published and printed after moving from the High Street. Lord Cockburn Street was named after Lord Cockburn who was one of the most respected Gentlemen of Edinburgh.  He Died in 1854 and a Carved Stone of his Head and Shoulders are above No1-3 Cockburn Street now the Edinburgh Military Tattoo Offices. The Edinburgh Military Tattoo Office was originally built as a hotel (The Cockburn hotel built circa 1862). The carving above door of a head is Lord Cockburn with gilt writing MacPherson on lintel. ( Hotel and Previous owner). Lord Cockburn was a conservationist and saved many important buildings in Edinburgh. The street is named after him. Lord Henry Cockburn died in 1854 at the age of 74.  A conservationist the Cockburn Association which was established in 1875 was named after Lord Henry Cockburn. A statue of Lord Henry Cockburn stands in the north-east corner of Parliament Hall in the High Street Edinburgh. When Cockburn Street was built it cut through (circa 1859) many old closes, which evidence of can be seen in Old Fleshmarket Close where the smallest pub in Edinburgh can be found on the north side of the severed close. Now Cockburn Street has a good selection of retail shops restaurants, fast food outlets bars and accommodation.

DEFINITION OF TARTAN

The actual definition of Tartan described by the Scottish Register of Tartans Act (2008) Section 2.

Section 2: A tartan is a design which is capable of being woven, consisting of two or more alternating coloured stripes which combine vertically and horizontal  to form a repeated chequered pattern. The tartan pattern is traditionally known as the sett of the tartan.

Below are a number of examples of Scottish Tartans and 2 American, which can be found on the Scottish register of tartans. Pop in to The Edinburgh Clothing Company at 93 South Bridge Edinburgh to see if you can find your Clan Tartan. 

Go to  www.tartanregister.gov.uk online for all tartans registered in the Scottish tartan's register. 

 SOUTH CAROLINA TARTAN            MUNRO TARTAN            FLOWER OF SCOTLAND TARTAN       MARSHALL TARTAN          NORTH CAROLINA TARTAN          CAMPBELL TARTAN

MACDONALD TARTAN            JOHN MUIR WAY TARTAN              GORDON TARTAN             UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH             SIHK TARTAN                CAMERON ANCIENT TARTAN

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Royal Mile, High Street  South

Bell's Wynd Royal Mile

Borthwick's Close Royal Mile

Burnet's Close Royal Mile

Cant's Close Royal Mile

Covenant Close Royal Mile

Dickson's Close Royal Mile

Fountain Close Royal Mile

Hyndford's Close Royal Mile

Melrose Close Royal Mile

New Assembly Close Royal Mile

Old Fishmarket Close

Old Assembly Close Royal Mile

South Gray's Close Royal Mile

Stevenlaw's Close Royal Mile

Toddrick's Wynd Royal Mile

Tweeddale Court Royal Mile

World's End Close Royal Mile

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

EdinburghEdinburghEdinburgh

EH1 1QY

EH1 1RD 

EH1 1QU

EH1 1TH  

EH1 1QS

EH1 1TH  

EH1 1TF

EH1 1TG

EH1 1TH  

EH1 1QQ

EH1 1RW

EH1 1QX

EH1 1TQ

EH1 1QT

EH1 1TB

EH1 1TE

EH1 1TD

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh Royal Mile

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Royal Mile, High Street  North

Advocate's Close Royal Mile

Allan's Close Royal Mile

Anchor Close Royal Mile

Byre's Close Royal Mile

Carrubber's Close, Royal Mile

Craig's Close Royal Mile

Fleshmarket Close Royal Mile

Geddes' Entry Royal Mile

Jackson's Close Royal Mile

Lyon's Close Royal Mile

North Foulis' Close Royal Mile

Bailie Fyfe's Close Royal Mile

Old Stamp Office Close Royal Mile

Roxburgh's Close Royal Mile

Warriston's Close Royal Mile

Writer's Court Royal Mile

Baron Maule's Close Royal Mile Bishop's Close Royal Mile           North Gray's Close Royal Mile Paisley Close Royal Mile Monteith’s Close Royal Mile Chalmer’s Close Royal Mile Trunk’s Close Royal Mile

Hope’s Court Royal Mile Morrison’s Close Royal Mile   

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

EH1 1ND

EH1 1PG 

EH1 1YJ

EH1 1PW

EH1 1SJ

EH1 1PG 

EH1 1QA

EH1 1PE

EH1 1PZ

EH1 1PX

EH1 1PE

EH1  1SW

EH1 1QS

EH1 1LW

EH1 1PG 

EH1 1PG 

EH1 1SR

EH1 1SG

EH1 1SG

EH1 1SG

EH1  1SR

EH1  1SR EH1  1SR EH1  1SR EH1  1SR

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland

© 2016 by All About Edinburgh. 

Edinburgh Weather

For a 6 day weather forecast in Edinburgh go to the foot of any All About Edinburgh page. The weather in Edinburgh is normally warmest during  June to September, The best Edinburgh weather is mostly in April and October. Always be prepared  Weather Edinburgh and Scotland is changeable.

started 16 / 03 /2017

For more things to do outside Edinburgh go to

www.lothianandborders.com